Professional Counselling for Families

Having a child diagnosed with cancer is the beginning of a difficult, and sometimes painful, experience for families.

The demands of living with cancer are many – frequent and long hospitalisations, separation from family and loved ones and aggressive treatment with adverse effects. All of these can lead to new and unfamiliar feelings of anxiety, fear, guilt, anger and suffering.

Sometimes, families need a little extra help to deal with and process these feelings, regardless of where they are at on the cancer treatment journey.

The Children’s Cancer Foundation understands how important it is for families to stay together during this time, to be able to be present for their child.

We are now supporting Australian families by funding professional counselling for children on or off treatment (up to 5 years), their parents or siblings.

Families wishing to know more about this support program should contact us.

Speaking with a qualified professional in a safe and respectful place can help families to work through concerns and help process some of these unfamiliar feelings. Family counselling can help with things like:

  • adjusting to a cancer diagnosis;
  • changes in relationships and family dynamics;
  • dealing with strong and unfamiliar emotions;
  • re-integrating into school and social systems; and
  • adjusting a ‘new’ normal once active treatment has ended.

"Our family has been fortunate enough to have benefited from the Children’s Cancer Foundation financial assistance of family counselling. Without this financial support, my husband and I would have had to cover the costs ourselves. It is a very expensive but necessary program my family needed access to, following the relapse of my daughter with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Thankfully the Foundation came to our aid and made a very difficult journey that little bit less burdensome,” said a mother receiving support through the service.

Thank you to The Pratt Foundation for providing a grant of $40,000 towards the Family Counselling Service.

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